Philadelphia City Council, programming

Philadelphia City Council: Deployment (12/12)

So I’ve still got work to do. Not all my charts look exactly as I’d like. There’s some data I could update if I could get to the right sources. I’d like to have some maps to visualize city council districts. That will all come soon. I do want to get what I have so far publicly available. Continue reading

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Philadelphia City Council, programming

Philadelphia City Council: Pie charts & Stacked bar charts (10/12)

Next I wanted to be able to visualize the racial, party, and gender makeup of City Council in any given year. I had an html GET request to let the user select a year. It was embedded in a try/except block and an if/else conditional block. Since it’s possible for a user to enter a query in the url directly, I wanted a safeguard against query terms that are not integers and against integers that are outside the range of my data. Continue reading

Philadelphia City Council, programming

Philadelphia City Council: d3 visualizations (9/12)

I’ve come across many javascript libraries used to make data visualizations like pie charts, bar charts, timelines, etc. The easier they are to use, the less customizable they are. In a very early version of my city council project I used highcharts. This produced some great charts but I wanted to be able to customize them more. Enter d3. Continue reading

Philadelphia City Council, programming

Philadelphia City Council: Unique councilmembers (8/12)

Philadelphia has a reputation for having low turnover among city councilmembers. The city has loosely accurately rosters of each year’s cohort going back to the 1950’s. Election data is maintained only from 1979 on, representing the cohort that started in January 1980, which included newly elected members and re-elected incumbents. So I decided to focus just from 1980 on to ask the question, “How many unique councilmembers have served your district since 1980?” Anti-clickbait: The answer will not astound you. Continue reading